MEDICINE

Becoming a doctor is a dream for many a young men and women, looking for a profession that is among the most respected, financially rewarding and attractive career in India. However the stark reality is that aspirants outnumber, by far, the available MBBS seats, resulting in increased competition, huge capitation fees, quota system etc forcing many aspirants with capability and aptitude to give up their doctor dream altogether or end up wasting years trying to repeat various entrance exams.

Though India through its 412 medical colleges produce over 45000 doctors annually, as per official figures released by Ministry of Health Government of India, there is only one doctor for every 1,700 citizens in India, clearly indicating that India faces huge dearth of doctors and would require about four lakhs more doctors by 2020 to reach the WHO mandated ratio of one doctor per 1,000 people. The mammoth shortfall of doctors is not limited to India. If one takes the WHO figure; the shortfall of doctors throughout the world is huge. Countries like United States, UK, and Australia also face a huge shortage which would reach alarming proportion by 2020.

Though developed countries of the world like USA , UK , Canada ,Australia etc remain the first choice of students and parent seeking world class medical education , one should be realistic that it can be extremely challenging in term of time, fees and intellectual effort though the reward for the same is a flourishing medical career. Moreover to get admission in institutions of these countries, students have to undertake the Admission Tests. The UK Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) or the Biomedical Admissions Test (BMAT), Graduate Australian Medical School Admission Test (GAMSAT) or MCAT (North American Medical College Admission Test and so on...